What the press has to say

THE AFTERNOON DESPATCH & COURIER, [JUNE 3,1996] BY KAMALA RAMCHANDANI.
…but, without a doubt it was Boman Irani who, as with his cameo role in Roshni, stole the show with his portrayal on an elderly parsee,from body language to shuffling feet. Not for a moment did he forget his characterization. With never a false note, he compelled one to watch him, with his laid back true to life depiction.

Irani is truly a gifted performer whose versatility is amazing.

The Times Of India, [MAY 23, 1996] BY JITEN MERCHANT:
…but the balance of power becomes even, thanks to Boman Irani’s magnificent Dhunjisha. This is one of those characterizations whose sheer ‘rightness’ cannot be described in words- nor could they do justice to moments such as his heartbreaking attempt to persuade his building committee chairman to let him stay, or his half crazed attack on the drug dealer. As such, it goes straight into this critic's short list of the most memorable performances he has seen.
UPBEAT JUNE 96
…Boman Irani`s brilliant portrayal of the bumbling & weak Dhunjisha who's almost given up the fight for getting a fair treatment on his forced retirement. 

THE AFTERNOON DESPATCH & COURIER
…it was Boman Irani who, as with his cameo role in ‘ROSHNI’, stole the show with his portrayal of an elderly Parsi, from body language to accent to shuffling feet. Not for a moment did he forget his characterization, whether during the humorous or more philosophical moments. With never a false note, he compelled one to watch him with his laid back true to life depiction. Irani is a truly gifted performer whose versatility is amazing.

KHALEEJ TIMES [DUBAI], NOVEMBER 2, 1996.
…veteran actor Sudhir Joshi and new found acting talent Boman Irani excel in their roles. Boman needs special mention for a finely controlled performance which has the makings of a classic.

THE INDIAN EXPRESS, 16 MAY 1996
…the other wise healthy & robust Irani gets in to the psyche of his character a while before performance & what further helps his mental make-up is his physical dressing: once he slips into the “sadra”, shirt, maroon skull cap and, pink framed plastic glasses, he almost magically transforms into Dhunjisha.

-DOLLY THAKORE
…young thirty five year old Boman Irani as the 75-year-old Dhunjisha Batliwalla was perfect in every nuance, every shuffle, every Parsee quirk including the hitching up of his khaki ankle length trousers with his elbows from time to time.

MAIL & GUARDIAN SEPTEMBER, 26 1998- NIC PAUL ON SHOW IN DURBAN.
Boman Irani MK Gandhi is a far cry from Ben Kingsley’s grease painted little saint: he's a tall & imposing figure who displays little of the humility Attenborough’s version of the story gave us, and this version of the man, unsurprisingly, is the more interesting.

THE GOOD LIFE, FRIDAY SEPT. 18 1998 BILLY SUTTER (DURBAN) FOR
MAHATMA vs GANDHI.
…Boman Irani noted in India as much for his photography as for his acting, has a commanding presence in the title role, convincingly & movingly transforming from energetic & angry, young barrister to bald, frail & softer voiced political icon.

INDIAN EXPRESS - KAMALA RAMCHANDANI
…but it was the cameo role that stole the show- Boman Irani made one sit up & take notice with an incredibly stylish rendering of ‘put your money where your mouth is’. He has a with it voice, an elegant dancing technique & tremendous stage presence, & we wish we had seen more of him.

SOCIETY, JUNE 1995 - ARATI KUMAR
…but there were some instances of genuine laughter from the audience- Boman Irani was on stage. Superb as the politician, screamingly funny as a pimp, he stole the show. 

ISLAND, JUNE 1995
…the only performer who really shone was photographer Boman Irani who handled his cameos with great ease. 

BUSINESS INDIA, JUNE 19 1995
…and except of some rare flashes of creativity- such as the visual media & Boman Irani’s dance sequence, `Put your money where your mouth is`, Roshini falls quiet flat.

SAVVY
…and the star of the show was Boman Irani, his double role was a double treat for Calcutta when the park's annual supper brought in Raell Padamsee’s `Family Ties`- 2. 

SUNDAY INDEPENDENT, (DURBAN, SOUTH AFRICA), SEPT. 27TH 1998 – ROBERT GREIG
Boman Irani plays the Mahatma, uses his hands incessantly, describing graceful curves and arcs in the air: a kind of parallel dialogue with his voice and body. The movements break the line of the body, create a shimmering effect, a magic around him. It contrasts with his portrait of Gandhi in later life looking oddly like a Maribou stork supported on a stick.
The back lighting is red or has projection of filtered light, through the outlines of branches. It is haunting to look at; like the swirling hands of Irani as Gandhi, it worked paradoxically.

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 © 1998 Boman Irani